VMware

Creating a Cluster via the govc CLI

In this guide we will create an HA Kubernetes cluster with 3 worker nodes. We will use the govc cli which can be downloaded here.

Prerequisites

Prior to starting, it is important to have the following infrastructure in place and available:

  • DHCP server
  • Load Balancer or DNS address for cluster endpoint

    • If using a load balancer, the most common setup is to balance tcp/443 across the control plane nodes tcp/6443
    • If using a DNS address, the A record should return back the addresses of the control plane nodes

Create the Machine Configuration Files

Generating Base Configurations

Using the DNS name or name of the loadbalancer used in the prereq steps, generate the base configuration files for the Talos machines:

$ talosctl gen config talos-k8s-vmware-tutorial https://<load balancer IP or DNS>:<port>
created init.yaml
created controlplane.yaml
created join.yaml
created talosconfig
$ talosctl gen config talos-k8s-vmware-tutorial https://<DNS name>:6443
created init.yaml
created controlplane.yaml
created join.yaml
created talosconfig

At this point, you can modify the generated configs to your liking.

Validate the Configuration Files

$ talosctl validate --config init.yaml --mode cloud
init.yaml is valid for cloud mode
$ talosctl validate --config controlplane.yaml --mode cloud
controlplane.yaml is valid for cloud mode
$ talosctl validate --config join.yaml --mode cloud
join.yaml is valid for cloud mode

Set Environment Variables

govc makes use of the following environment variables

export GOVC_URL=<vCenter url>
export GOVC_USERNAME=<vCenter username>
export GOVC_PASSWORD=<vCenter password>

Note: If your vCenter installation makes use of self signed certificates, you'll want to export GOVC_INSECURE=true.

There are some additional variables that you may need to set:

export GOVC_DATACENTER=<vCenter datacenter>
export GOVC_RESOURCE_POOL=<vCenter resource pool>
export GOVC_DATASTORE=<vCenter datastore>
export GOVC_NETWORK=<vCenter network>

Download the OVA

A talos.ova asset is published with each release. We will refer to the version of the release as $TALOS_VERSION below. It can be easily exported with export TALOS_VERSION="v0.3.0-alpha.10" or similar.

curl -LO https://github.com/talos-systems/talos/releases/download/$TALOS_VERSION/talos.ova

Import the OVA into vCenter

We'll need to repeat this step for each Talos node we want to create. In a typical HA setup, we'll have 3 control plane nodes and N workers. In the following example, we'll setup a HA control plane with two worker nodes.

govc import.ova -name talos-$TALOS_VERSION /path/to/downloaded/talos.ova

Create the Bootstrap Node

We'll clone the OVA to create the bootstrap node (our first control plane node).

govc vm.clone -on=false -vm talos-$TALOS_VERSION control-plane-1

Talos makes use of the guestinfo facility of VMware to provide the machine/cluster configuration. This can be set using the govc vm.change command. To facilitate persistent storage using the vSphere cloud provider integration with Kubernetes, disk.enableUUID=1 is used.

govc vm.change \
  -e "guestinfo.talos.config=$(cat init.yaml | base64)" \
  -e "disk.enableUUID=1" \
  -vm /ha-datacenter/vm/control-plane-1

Update Hardware Resources for the Bootstrap Node

  • -c is used to configure the number of cpus
  • -m is used to configure the amount of memory (in MB)
govc vm.change \
  -c 2 \
  -m 4096 \
  -vm /ha-datacenter/vm/control-plane-1

The following can be used to adjust the ephemeral disk size.

govc vm.disk.change -vm control-plane-1 -disk.name disk-1000-0 -size 10G
govc vm.power -on control-plane-1

Create the Remaining Control Plane Nodes

govc vm.clone -on=false -vm talos-$TALOS_VERSION control-plane-2
govc vm.change \
  -e "guestinfo.talos.config=$(base64 controlplane.yaml)" \
  -e "disk.enableUUID=1" \
  -vm /ha-datacenter/vm/control-plane-2
govc vm.clone -on=false -vm talos-$TALOS_VERSION control-plane-3
govc vm.change \
  -e "guestinfo.talos.config=$(base64 controlplane.yaml)" \
  -e "disk.enableUUID=1" \
  -vm /ha-datacenter/vm/control-plane-3
govc vm.change \
  -c 2 \
  -m 4096 \
  -vm /ha-datacenter/vm/control-plane-2
govc vm.change \
  -c 2 \
  -m 4096 \
  -vm /ha-datacenter/vm/control-plane-3
govc vm.disk.change -vm control-plane-2 -disk.name disk-1000-0 -size 10G
govc vm.disk.change -vm control-plane-3 -disk.name disk-1000-0 -size 10G
govc vm.power -on control-plane-2
govc vm.power -on control-plane-3

Update Settings for the Worker Nodes

govc vm.clone -on=false -vm talos-$TALOS_VERSION worker-1
govc vm.change \
  -e "guestinfo.talos.config=$(base64 join.yaml)" \
  -e "disk.enableUUID=1" \
  -vm /ha-datacenter/vm/worker-1
govc vm.clone -on=false -vm talos-$TALOS_VERSION worker-2
govc vm.change \
  -e "guestinfo.talos.config=$(base64 join.yaml)" \
  -e "disk.enableUUID=1" \
  -vm /ha-datacenter/vm/worker-2
govc vm.change \
  -c 4 \
  -m 8192 \
  -vm /ha-datacenter/vm/worker-1
govc vm.change \
  -c 4 \
  -m 8192 \
  -vm /ha-datacenter/vm/worker-2
govc vm.disk.change -vm worker-1 -disk.name disk-1000-0 -size 50G
govc vm.disk.change -vm worker-2 -disk.name disk-1000-0 -size 50G
govc vm.power -on worker-1
govc vm.power -on worker-2

Retrieve the kubeconfig

At this point we can retrieve the admin kubeconfig by running:

talosctl --talosconfig talosconfig config endpoint <control plane 1 IP>
talosctl --talosconfig talosconfig config node <control plane 1 IP>
talosctl --talosconfig talosconfig kubeconfig .